Classical horn crook combinations for A=440, 430, and 415

With the full set of crooks, couplers, and long tuning slide offered with the Halari and Courtois classical horns, it is possible to play in all of the necessary keys at three pitch levels - A=440, 430, and 415


A = 440 (and 415) :

C alto – C alto crook + short slide

B natural alto – C alto + short slide, pull slide (A=415 C alto)

A – A crook + short slide (A= 415 Bb alto)

Ab – Ab crook, short slide, or A + long slide (A= 415 A)

G – G crook + short slide (A= 415 Ab)

F# - Bb alto + short coupler + short slide (A= 415 G)

F - F crook + short slide (A= 415 F#)

E – E crook + short slide (A= 415 E)

Eb – Eb crook + short slide (A= 415 E)

D – D crook + short slide, or F crook + short coupler + short slide (A= 415 Eb)

Db - E crook + long coupler + short slide (A= 415 D)

C basso – C crook + short slide or Eb crook + long coupler + short slide, pull slide (A= 415 Db)

B natural basso - D crook + long coupler + long slide (A= 415 C basso)

Bb  basso – C basso crook + short coupler + short slide, or Eb crook + short and long couplers + short slide (A= 415 B natural basso)

A basso – D crook + short and long couplers + long slide (A= 415 Bb basso)


A = 430:

C alto – C alto crook + short slide, pull slide

B natural alto – C alto + short slide, pull slide

A – A crook + short slide, pull slide

Ab – Ab crook, short slide, or A + long slide , pull slide

G – G crook + short slide, pull slide

F# - Bb alto + short coupler + long slide

F = F crook + long slide

E – E crook + long slide

Eb – Eb crook + long slide

D – D crook + long slide, or F crook + long coupler + short slide

Db = E crook + long coupler + long slide

C basso – C crook + long slide or Eb crook + long coupler + long slide, pull slide

B natural basso - D crook + long coupler + long slide, pull slide

Bb basso – C basso crook + long coupler + short slide, or Eb crook + short and long couplers + long slide

A basso – D crook + short and long couplers + long slide, pull slide.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Below lists natural horn keys with their corresponding fingering on the modern horn. If a piece of music says the key on the left you can press the key combination on the right on the modern double horn to get the correct tube length. This is useful for simulating natural horn when playing older compositions.

  • B♭ alto – T0

  • A – T2

  • A♭ – T1

  • G – T12

  • G♭/F♯ – T23

  • F – open

  • E – 2

  • E♭ – 1

  • D – 12

  • D♭ – 23

  • C – 13

  • B basso – 123 (generally very sharp; pull tuning slide and/or valve slides out somewhat)

  • B♭ basso – not possible on F horn, unless you pull all the valve slides and tuning slide out as far as they will go (without detaching) and then use the 123 fingering. Even then, the intonation may still be sharp, and a greater degree of hand in the horn can be needed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hand-stopping

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

Jump to: navigation, search

 

Hand-stopping is a technique by which a natural horn can be made to produce notes outside of its normal harmonic series. By inserting the hand, cupped, into the bell, the player can reduce the pitch of a note by a semitone or more. This, combined with the use of crooks changing the key of the instrument, allowed composers to write fully chromatic music for the horn before the invention of piston and valve horns in the early 19th Century.

The technique was invented in Europe in the mid 18th Century, and its first celebrated exponent was Giovanni Punto, who learned the technique from A. J. Hampel and subsequently taught it to the Court orchestra of George III.

In addition to the change in pitch, the timbre is changed, sounding somewhat muted. Some pieces call for notes to be played stopped (sometimes written as gestopft in the score) specifically in order to produce this muted tone. This can clearly be heard on recordings of natural horns playing pre-valve repertoire such as the Weber concertino (a recording by Anthony Halstead and the Hanover Band is available which demonstrates this to particularly good effect).

The pitch control is affected by the degree of closing the bell with the right hand. As the palm closes the bell, the effective tube length is increased, lowering the pitch (up to about a semitone for horns in the range D through G). But when the hand stops the bell completely, the tube length is shortened, raising pitch about a semitone for horns tuned near to the key of F.

  • Facebook Social Icon
  • Twitter Social Icon
  • Google+ Social Icon
  • YouTube Social  Icon
  • LinkedIn Social Icon
Nelson Velez Boswell's Personal Coat of Arms
Velez and Boswell Individual Coat of Arms